Year in Review: Blood and blood forming products

In 2018/2019 PHARMAC took an important step forward for people with severe haemophilia.

Haemophilia is a condition where a person’s blood does not clot normally, due to lacking one or more of the plasma proteins needed.

From 1 May 2019, around 160 people with severe haemophilia in New Zealand have had some of the broadest access in the world to two new long-acting medicines.

PHARMAC funded two medicines – extended half-life Factor VIII (Adynovate) and Factor IX (Alprolix) – which reduce the number of injections people need to administer to themselves each week.

The new longer acting treatments provide protection against bleeding episodes for longer.

Previous treatments for haemophilia required a patient to self-administer (or have a parent, carer or nurse administer) an injection up to three times per week to be protected from bleeding.

The data below shows that since haemophilia products were included in PHARMAC’s remit in 2014, the amount of expenditure on blood and blood forming products has risen steadily, increasing 12% to $126.9M in 2019. Prescription volumes are up 1.2%.

Blood and blood forming products: Comparison of gross cost and number of prescriptions

Blood and blood forming products: Comparison of gross cost and number of prescriptions.